Taskbar invisible over Remote Desktop

I frequently use Remote Desktop (RDP/Terminal Services) to access my machines running Vista SP1 RTM. 90% of the time, after connecting, I get this annoying problem with the Start bar:

image

Only the Start button itself is visible.

  • This happens on all my Vista machines, both SP0 and SP1
  • This happens no matter what version of Remote Desktop I am using, the XP version or the “new” Vista one
  • It only appears to happen when the computer was originally using the Aero DWM composition engine and originally in a different resolution to what I am asking the Remote Desktop session to render
  • It happens wether or not the taskbar is at the top or bottom of the screen

So far the only way to get the taskbar back I have found is to click the lonely Start button, click Windows Security, choose Start Task Manager, kill the explorer.exe process and start it again in the Task Manager from File > Run.

Subsequent Remote Desktop connections are then fine, but logging back into the machine from the console then back into Remote Desktop makes it disappear again. A bit frustrating, to say the least.

Windows Live ID Return URL banned words

UPDATE: No need to do this now, its fixed!

For edngames.com I use Facebook, Yahoo! and Windows Live as sign on solutions. However, Windows Live is the only system with a restriction on the domain names you can register. For instance, because of the word “games” in my domain, I get the error message “The Return URL field contains a forbidden word or domain. Please use a different Return URL and enter the HIP solution again.”

image

Facebook and Yahoo, competing single sign on solutions, do not have this restriction, which the word “game” I assume is to block gambling sites from the authentication.

To get around this, I have had to set up a dummy domain (edslife.co.uk) without the banned words and perform authentication on that – you cannot simply do a redirect because the signature returned by the Windows Live server will be invalid because its a different return URL. I then have to create my own authentication (I use a hash function based on the time and a secret word) to move between the dummy domain to the real one securely.

image 

Although this works, and is just as secure as authenticating on the target site I reckon, it provides a pretty shoddy user experience because I have to explain that there is another domain name involved. You also cannot use this method to get data from the Windows Live server such as contact information because from a different domain, the authentication is invalid.